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I recently got myself a library card. It has worked out wonderfully, because Oakland Library has a branch right by my house. I can request for any book in the Oakland Library system to be sent to my local branch for me to pick up.

 

I am making an effort to read more books. I used to be a massive philistine when it came to books! So I am now playing catch-up. 

What is your favorite book, or what's something you've read that you've enjoyed a ton and would feel pretty good recommending to someone?

 

Right now I am ready "Beloved" by Toni Morrison. It is my first Toni Morrison novel! I can see why it is so well regarded (it won the Pulitzer for fiction in 1987), but I don't think my brain is wired for the language. Sometimes I find myself having to re-read a paragraph here and there because the words just don't mean anything to me. I don't think I'm dyslexic, but I can't be sure (I've never gotten tested).

I also have "Timequake" by Kurt Vonnegut sitting on my bookshelf (courtesy of @starsailor, who has lent me every Vonnegut book I've read (I think I've read four so far)) that I plan to start once I finish "Beloved." 

 

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22 hours ago, Tracey said:

I recently got myself a library card. It has worked out wonderfully, because Oakland Library has a branch right by my house. I can request for any book in the Oakland Library system to be sent to my local branch for me to pick up.

 

I am making an effort to read more books. I used to be a massive philistine when it came to books! So I am now playing catch-up. 

What is your favorite book, or what's something you've read that you've enjoyed a ton and would feel pretty good recommending to someone?

 

Right now I am ready "Beloved" by Toni Morrison. It is my first Toni Morrison novel! I can see why it is so well regarded (it won the Pulitzer for fiction in 1987), but I don't think my brain is wired for the language. Sometimes I find myself having to re-read a paragraph here and there because the words just don't mean anything to me. I don't think I'm dyslexic, but I can't be sure (I've never gotten tested).

I also have "Timequake" by Kurt Vonnegut sitting on my bookshelf (courtesy of @starsailor, who has lent me every Vonnegut book I've read (I think I've read four so far)) that I plan to start once I finish "Beloved." 

 

Man, please read Morrison's JAZZ. It's quite a novel.

I will also do my perfunctory recommendation of Robert E. Howard's Conan story titled RED NAILS. Possibly the most integral fantasy story ever written!

I tried getting Kerwin to read it years ago, but when I recommended it he just kicked me in the taters.

My "taters" have healed but my self-worth has since yet to recover.

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31 minutes ago, CoffinJerk said:

Man, please read Morrison's JAZZ. It's quite a novel.

I will also do my perfunctory recommendation of Robert E. Howard's Conan story titled RED NAILS. Possibly the most integral fantasy story ever written!

I tried getting Kerwin to read it years ago, but when I recommended it he just kicked me in the taters.

My "taters" have healed but my self-worth has since yet to recover.

What is taters precious?

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well! i’m reading two books at once right now.

A CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES aaaaand THE END OF THE ROAD

for my li’l teeny tiny baby trip to oakland i brought the end of the road and finished the whole thing on the plane over and on BART.

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Posted (edited)

i just read MEMORIAL by Alice Oswald. it's a very loose poetic translation of the ILIAD that decides to skip the vast majority of it, leaving only obituary-like descriptions of soldier's deaths and bucolic vignettes of natural phenomena and rural life. it is extremely quotable so here are a few passages: 

Quote

EUPHORBAS died
Leaving his silver hairclip on the battlefield

Quote

DOLOPS the strongest son of Lumpus
Not believing he could die
Even when his spear hit solid metal
And banged back again
Even when a man hacked off his helmet
And he saw his own eye-holes
Staring up at him from the ground
It was not until the beak of death
Pushed out through his own chest
That he recognised the wings of darkness

Quote

Like a boat
Going into the foaming mouth of a wave
In the body of the wind
Everything vanishes
And the sailors stare at mid-air

Quote

One of the Myrmidoms he was a man of influence
A prince of Budeion he was well-dressed
He was generous and reliable
Until he killed his cousin
Then he became a runaway then a beggar
Then a soldier then a corpse
A sharp rock struck him
And the understanding drained from his skull
Now he doesn't recognise himself

Quote

As if it was June
A poppy being hammered by the rain
Sinks it's head down
It's exactly like that
When a man's neck gives in
And the bronze calyx of his helmet
Sinks his head down

Quote

ILIONEUS an only child ran out of luck
He always wore that well-off look
His parents had a sheep farm
They didn't think he would die
But a spear stuck through his eye
He sat down backwards
Trying to snatch back the light
With stretched out hands

Quote

Like when a mother is rushing
And a little girl clings to her clothes
Wants help wants arms
Won't let her walk
Like staring up at that tower of adulthood
Wanting to be light again
Wanting this whole problem of living to be lifted
And carried on a hip

 

 

Edited by tombo

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On 4/2/2018 at 2:22 PM, CoffinJerk said:

Man, please read Morrison's JAZZ. It's quite a novel.

I will also do my perfunctory recommendation of Robert E. Howard's Conan story titled RED NAILS. Possibly the most integral fantasy story ever written!

I tried getting Kerwin to read it years ago, but when I recommended it he just kicked me in the taters.

My "taters" have healed but my self-worth has since yet to recover.

wait i just saw this! i DID read red nails! it is now the only conan story i've ever read

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2 minutes ago, swampfriend said:

wait i just saw this! i DID read red nails! it is now the only conan story i've ever read

acknowledging mccune's pitiful post now is not going to do anything for his taters for his self-worth, which you have damaged with your hateful kicking.

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14 minutes ago, starsailor said:

acknowledging mccune's pitiful post now is not going to do anything for his taters for his self-worth, which you have damaged with your hateful kicking.

wait, you're right. i'm thinking of RED TATERS, which isn't even a story but just the state i left him in

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3 minutes ago, swampfriend said:

wait, you're right. i'm thinking of RED TATERS, which isn't even a story but just the state i left him in

listen i don't even know what is taters, precious, but you hurt the poor boy's taters and no amount of "oh wait i read that" or "oh wait now i remember" is going to piece them taters back together. you are a monster

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20180328_131318_1522268400900.thumb.jpeg.c4893f70067606d2f8faca84e7b5ad0f.jpeg

I found this one on the street a year ago or so.  I've been rereading it and recommend if it isn't one of the four you've already gotten through. 

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On 4/1/2018 at 3:57 PM, Tracey said:

Right now I am ready "Beloved" by Toni Morrison.

I wish I could remember this book better. All I really remember is

Spoiler

KISS ME IN THE DARK AND CALL ME BELOVED!

oh and

Spoiler

turtle fucking

 

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oh i have my dead grandfathers professor's edition of one flew over the cuckoos nest. it's got his notes in it. he died when my dad was 18, so i never knew him

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20 hours ago, alaynoboost said:

20180328_131318_1522268400900.thumb.jpeg.c4893f70067606d2f8faca84e7b5ad0f.jpeg

I found this one on the street a year ago or so.  I've been rereading it and recommend if it isn't one of the four you've already gotten through. 

I have! I have read "Slaughterhouse Five," "Cat's Cradle," "God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater," and "Welcome to the Monkey House," in that order. I have also read some essays from "Fates Worse Than Death." I think "Cat's Cradle" is my favorite. 

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months and months ago i met a very nice boy named "micah" when i was hanging with my buddies at a really good thai restaurant on elizabeth street in manhattan. micah had been sort of half-crying about his boyfriend. he told me that him and his boyfriend had gotten into a fight earlier that evening, and in a fit of rage the boyfriend took his tiger balm, a set of sheets (?), and some cologne. i think micah was drunk, and i sure did never see him again after that night! i'm not sure if he knew one of my friends or not. . . maybe ill ask soon... ANYWAY: he gave me a book recommendation and i rediscovered the note i wrote that night on my old phone a few days ago. the book was PRACTICALITIES BY MARGUERITE DURAS well, what do you know: it's available at my ~~favorite~~ bookstore. i called and asked this morning! when i get back to new york city in two weeks i guess i'll go buy it and read it! 

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one of the perfect writers for me is vladimir nabokov. i've read about 8 of his books, and only one of those made me go, "that was just okay!" the others make me go, "hot damn!" i've also read 2/3rds of his collected short stories over the last however many years.

i hadn't read him in a while, though, so when my brain was feeling bad a few weekends ago, i gave him a try. the way he writes makes my thoughts run clearer, while also giving me room to wander and re-read some passages as i go. i finished his autobiography, speak, memory, after leaving the last few chapters unread for a couple of years. i loved it! then i read his earliest play, the tragedy of mister morn, which someone had given me a couple of birthdays ago — and it was pretty good, not my favorite, but he wrote it at like 24 and then somebody else translated it from russian into english after he died! my favorite of his novels are the ones he wrote in english in the latter half of his life.

anyway now i'm reading the gift and enjoying the heck out of it. a lot of his stories start out kind of hum-de-dum just going along, then we get some interesting details, and then something shifts to totally recontextualize everything that came before, but without undermining it. the first part is about a mid-twenties author who thinks there's been a good review of his volume of poetry, but maybe there wasn't!

i read a bunch of it in the bathtub on sunday and damned if i'm not gonna do that again at my soonest opportunity.

the book that made me love him was pale fire.

on a sullen afternoon in my 18th year, after everything i'd worked for was taken, i went to a borders and bought both fight club and nabokov's lolita at the same time. fight club has a sweaty man's bruised chest on it, and lolita had a young girl's knock-kneed legs. i felt like a fucking disgusting pervert but was looking forward to reading both of this books at school, instead of listening. i liked both books okay at the time, but feel pretty all right about the fact that i'm still reading nabokov a decade later and have left palahniuk behind.

chuck's best book that i still like is rant. that's a wild book.

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2 hours ago, splendorr said:

chuck's best book that i still like is rant. that's a wild book.

i've only read choke and lullaby 

both i didn't care for that much but choke was an entertaining easy-read 

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3 hours ago, splendorr said:

one of the perfect writers for me is vladimir nabokov. i've read about 8 of his books, and only one of those made me go, "that was just okay!" the others make me go, "hot damn!" i've also read 2/3rds of his collected short stories over the last however many years.

i hadn't read him in a while, though, so when my brain was feeling bad a few weekends ago, i gave him a try. the way he writes makes my thoughts run clearer, while also giving me room to wander and re-read some passages as i go. i finished his autobiography, speak, memory, after leaving the last few chapters unread for a couple of years. i loved it! then i read his earliest play, the tragedy of mister morn, which someone had given me a couple of birthdays ago — and it was pretty good, not my favorite, but he wrote it at like 24 and then somebody else translated it from russian into english after he died! my favorite of his novels are the ones he wrote in english in the latter half of his life.

anyway now i'm reading the gift and enjoying the heck out of it. a lot of his stories start out kind of hum-de-dum just going along, then we get some interesting details, and then something shifts to totally recontextualize everything that came before, but without undermining it. the first part is about a mid-twenties author who thinks there's been a good review of his volume of poetry, but maybe there wasn't!

i read a bunch of it in the bathtub on sunday and damned if i'm not gonna do that again at my soonest opportunity.

the book that made me love him was pale fire.

on a sullen afternoon in my 18th year, after everything i'd worked for was taken, i went to a borders and bought both fight club and nabokov's lolita at the same time. fight club has a sweaty man's bruised chest on it, and lolita had a young girl's knock-kneed legs. i felt like a fucking disgusting pervert but was looking forward to reading both of this books at school, instead of listening. i liked both books okay at the time, but feel pretty all right about the fact that i'm still reading nabokov a decade later and have left palahniuk behind.

chuck's best book that i still like is rant. that's a wild book.

Ada or Ardor is very good too!  I read it while I was in college and associate it with being on Santa Cruz campus in the trees.  I wasn't reading it for any class, but because a friend recommended it.  I remember it absorbing me and being hilarious in a disarming way.  Be prepared for cousins canoodling.

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4 hours ago, splendorr said:

one of the perfect writers for me is vladimir nabokov. i've read about 8 of his books, and only one of those made me go, "that was just okay!" the others make me go, "hot damn!" i've also read 2/3rds of his collected short stories over the last however many years.

i hadn't read him in a while, though, so when my brain was feeling bad a few weekends ago, i gave him a try. the way he writes makes my thoughts run clearer, while also giving me room to wander and re-read some passages as i go. i finished his autobiography, speak, memory, after leaving the last few chapters unread for a couple of years. i loved it! then i read his earliest play, the tragedy of mister morn, which someone had given me a couple of birthdays ago — and it was pretty good, not my favorite, but he wrote it at like 24 and then somebody else translated it from russian into english after he died! my favorite of his novels are the ones he wrote in english in the latter half of his life.

anyway now i'm reading the gift and enjoying the heck out of it. a lot of his stories start out kind of hum-de-dum just going along, then we get some interesting details, and then something shifts to totally recontextualize everything that came before, but without undermining it. the first part is about a mid-twenties author who thinks there's been a good review of his volume of poetry, but maybe there wasn't!

i read a bunch of it in the bathtub on sunday and damned if i'm not gonna do that again at my soonest opportunity.

the book that made me love him was pale fire.

on a sullen afternoon in my 18th year, after everything i'd worked for was taken, i went to a borders and bought both fight club and nabokov's lolita at the same time. fight club has a sweaty man's bruised chest on it, and lolita had a young girl's knock-kneed legs. i felt like a fucking disgusting pervert but was looking forward to reading both of this books at school, instead of listening. i liked both books okay at the time, but feel pretty all right about the fact that i'm still reading nabokov a decade later and have left palahniuk behind.

chuck's best book that i still like is rant. that's a wild book.

I read my first-ever Nabokov, "Lolita," last year. I had seen the Stanley Kubrick movie before reading the book and had thought, "Hmm, I don't really understand why people are so wild about this." When I read the book, I understood why it was such a big deal. Reading the book also made me realize that that the people who carry the purses shaped like copies of the Lolita book, or who deliberately wear Lolita sunglasses for the Lolita reference, probably have not actually read the book. Because if they had, they'd know that Lolita was raped every day for two years, and there's nothing cute about that!

I finished "Beloved" last night and it was excellent. 

 

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4 hours ago, splendorr said:

the book that made me love him was pale fire.

I told some people this and moby dick are the funniest books I ever read once and they looked at me like I just spat in their coffee. But suffice to say I find that book hilarious..............

what I didn’t enjoy was laughter in the dark that book was just so cruel. But I have to second ada as being my fav Nabokov book. Also I rly enjoy his unfinished book, the original of Laura. 

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4 hours ago, Tracey said:

people who carry the purses shaped like copies of the Lolita book, or who deliberately wear Lolita sunglasses for the Lolita reference, probably have not actually read the book

yeah and then joke about/actually involve themselves in obtaining a "sugar daddy" but don't see the how they're fetishizing their youth/the "little girl" thing. which is insanely wrong and creepy on a humanistic level (lol) BECAUSE:

4 hours ago, Tracey said:

Lolita was raped every day for two years, and there's nothing cute about that!

 

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oh and @Tracey was it you who said you loved George Saunders?? in a different thread i think... and i hope it was you who said it

but my sister gave me Tenth of December for christmas this past year ~ still have yet to read it !!

 IMG_5482.thumb.jpg.2a26f359145060f2bf524571e6e27b9d.jpg

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38 minutes ago, soaplitz said:

oh and @Tracey was it you who said you loved George Saunders?? in a different thread i think... and i hope it was you who said it

but my sister gave me Tenth of December for christmas this past year ~ still have yet to read it !!

 IMG_5482.thumb.jpg.2a26f359145060f2bf524571e6e27b9d.jpg

I do love George Saunders!

And I love Spock! What a beautiful face he has! He strikes me as a very good friend. He looks like he is perfect hugging size. He could be Humphrey's first cousin once removed!

Back to George Saunders -- "Tenth of December" is his most high-profile collection of short stories, and it has some very good ones in there, but I prefer some of his other collections, such as "Pastoralia" and "CivilWarLand In Bad Declined." He is also a very kind man, which is nice, because lots of people who have found success turn out to be jerks. I wrote him a few times and he patiently responded every time! 

Back to Spock -- what a face! :kirbyhappy:

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13 minutes ago, Tracey said:

I do love George Saunders!

And I love Spock! What a beautiful face he has! He strikes me as a very good friend. He looks like he is perfect hugging size. He could be Humphrey's first cousin once removed!

 Back to George Saunders -- "Tenth of December" is his most high-profile collection of short stories, and it has some very good ones in there, but I prefer some of his other collections, such as "Pastoralia" and "CivilWarLand In Bad Declined." He is also a very kind man, which is nice, because lots of people who have found success turn out to be jerks. I wrote him a few times and he patiently responded every time! 

Back to Spock -- what a face! :kirbyhappy:

he is a very good friend, and a very good boy. i take him with me wherever i go! he'll even be in Los Angeles with me for a little bit this summer too. i took him back to atlanta yesterday, and lucky for me there was an empty seat in my aisle! so he just slept peacefully in the seat for the whole flight :heartcontainer: i love my li'l flufferkins. he's on the bed with me and got his li'l head on my shin right now as i type this! 

i sure do love this books thread y'all!! i have the bad habit of reading 3+ novels at once . . . and as soon as i can really rip through a new good book that's been in my head or on my list for a while-- i'm sure i'll have more interesting stuff to say here~ 

usually i have a book i'm pretty focused on and then the other book i read simultaneously is like junk-food literature, if you will. i call it that because those books tend to be true crime or a contemporary page-turner of that sorts l o l

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3 minutes ago, Tracey said:

 "very nice color."

keeping up with his dye jobs ain't cheap. 

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